Tag Archives: andromeda galaxy

9 Strangest Galaxies In The Universe!

9 Strangest Galaxies In The Universe!

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From galaxies that are shaped weirdly, to ones that have unique properties, join me as I show you the strangest galaxies in the universe!
9. ESO 137-001
I want you to think about the “shapes” of universes. Depending on the pictures you look at, you likely think of things like the spirals that many galaxies are believed to be shaped as. But in the case of ESO 137-001, that isn’t exactly the case. Because this galaxy…is shaped like a Jellyfish.
No, really, the spiral form of the galaxy is still there. BUT, it also has a “tail” that is formed by stars that are in its “wake” if you will, and it’s quite a tail as it extends over 260,000 light years into space!

8. NGC 1052-DF2
Ok, this one was weird in context as I’ll explain. You see, in 2018, the Hubble Space Telescope (one of the most important pieces of technology we have in terms of mapping space) found a galaxy known as NGC 1052-DF2. When scientists and astronomers looked at the galaxy though, they felt that something was missing. Mainly, there was a lack of Dark Matter, and that should’ve been impossible.
“Dark matter is conventionally believed to be an integral part of all galaxies — the glue that holds them together and the underlying scaffolding upon which they are built,” explains co-author Allison Merritt from Yale University and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany.

7. MACS 2129-1
The place known as MACS 2129-1 is definitely a galaxy that stands out for a whole host of reasons. Not the least of which is because it’s what’s known as a “No life Galaxy”. To be clear, there is life in the form of stars and planets within it, that’s not the issue. But, the galaxy is no longer “active”, meaning that it’s not making anymore stars despite it being over 10 billion years old.

6. The Andromeda galaxy
Arguably the most famous galaxy in the universe outside the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy is one that has led many people to wonder what is just outside our own galaxy, mainly because it’s our neighbor. Not just that, it’s our largest neighbor by a wide margin, and there’s a very good reason for that. Mainly, the Andromeda Galaxy is known as a “cannibal galaxy”.
What does that mean? Well, as the title describes, it actually collides with and devours other galaxies in order to make itself bigger:
“Andromeda has a much bigger and more complex stellar halo than the Milky Way, which indicates that it has cannibalized many more galaxies, possibly larger ones,” lead study author Dougal Mackey, an astronomer at Australian National University, said in a statement. “Knowing what kind of a monster our galaxy is up against is useful in finding out the Milky Way’s ultimate fate.”

So, remember the Jellyfish Galaxy we talked about a little while ago? Well, meet its cousin, the Tadpole Galaxy. This one is very on the nose in terms of its name because of the fact that it has a LONG tail that is attached to a body that reminds scientists of a tadpole. So looking at this you may wonder, “How did this happen?” According to the ones who found it, it’s a remnant of sorts from a galaxy that collided with another.
4. W2246-0526
If this list has shown you anything so far, it’s that the state of our universe is very much in a state of flux. But what you might not realize is that while some galaxies do collide with each other, others go and just steal things from one another. They alter shapes, steal stars, and sometimes even become brighter. Which is the case with W2246-0526:

3. Little Cub
Found in the Ursa Major Constellation, there is a dwarf galaxy known fondly as the “Little Cub”, and it’s one that has scientists very curious despite its impending doom. Why is that? Because the “Little Cub” as it is known is a galaxy that is dormant, and it has remained unchanged for about 13.7 billion years. If you know the alleged history of the universe, that would mean that it has been the same since the beginning of the universe more or less.

2. The Petal Galaxy
Let’s dig back into the visuals of galaxies for a bit. There are many galaxies out there in the universe that are growing at various rates as we’ve shown. But ESO 381-12 is different. Not only is this one growing, it’s growing in a way and in a shape that is truly baffling scientists. How so? Well, it looks like a flower in bloom, and the “petals” as they are known aren’t symmetrical.

1. Messier 83
15 million light years away in the Hydra is the galaxy known as Messier 83, and it is a galaxy that has caught a lot of people’s eyes. Mainly because those who have looked at it noticed that it has “two hearts”:

#InsaneCuriosity #StrangestGalaxies #HowTheUniverseWorks

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What Lies Beyond Our Solar System?

What Lies Beyond Our Solar System?

From the planets, to the stars, to the systems, to the great unknown of the universe, join us as we explore what lies beyond our solar system!
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8. The Scope Of Our Own Solar System
Before we look beyond it, let’s take stock of our own solar system and what it all is like. There are 8 definitive planets (and more than that if you count Dwarf Planets like Pluto), we have one star, The Sun, that we orbit around, and within the confines of our system are asteroid belts, various rocks of various sizes, tons of solar rays and radiation, and a whole lot more.
Just in our solar system there is a LOT of stuff to explore. Which is sometimes hard to find because the length of our solar system is about 287.46 billion kilometers long. And even in the year 2020 we’re STILL finding out things about our solar system that are shocking and surprising. But of course, the main goal of humanity as a whole is to do what many have thought is unthinkable. To go BEYOND our solar system and to not just see it, but explore it, and live upon it. To truly become a species that is intergalactic instead of just living in one very small part of the universe.
7. What Lies Immediately Beyond Our Solar System
So let’s posit for a moment that you are able to go and get out of the reach of our solar system. Behind the Kuiper Belt, beyond the Heliosphere, what are you going to find when you reach that edge beyond? What will you see? What will you experience?
The honest and very simple answer…is nothing. Because you’ll be in what is known as Intergalactic Space. Or, the space between galaxies and systems. But to be clear, just because you don’t see anything, doesn’t mean that nothing is there.
“If you took a cubic meter, there would be less than one atom in it,” Michael Shull, an astronomer at the University of Colorado Boulder, told Live Science. “But when you add it all up, it’s somewhere between 50 and 80% of all the ordinary matter out there.”
Scientists are honestly deeply interested in this matter, or “Intergalactic Medium” because of how they feel it forms and even replenishes certain systems via the gas that it provides. The reason for this is that the medium is mostly hot, ionized hydrogen (hydrogen that has lost its electron) with bits of heavier elements such as carbon, oxygen and silicon thrown in. While these elements typically don’t glow bright enough to be seen directly, scientists know they’re there because of the signature they leave on light that passes by.
“IGM is the gas that feeds star formation in galaxies,” Shull said. “If we didn’t still have gas falling in, being pulled in by gravity, star formation would slowly grind to a halt as the gas [in the galaxy] gets used up.”
But because of its small numbers, when you’re floating through space, you’re almost literally floating through empty space. Which is why many note that all the planets and stars and celestial objects only fill up about 5% of the known universe. Everything else is minor matter, Dark Energy and Dark Matter.
6. Systems Beyond Our Own
Ok, so let’s say that you are able to reach another system. What would it be like? Well, that would depend on what you land upon.
Because there are at least 100 billion stars in the Milky Way, a spiral galaxy about 100,000 light-years across. The stars are arranged in a pinwheel pattern with four major arms, and we live in one of them, about two-thirds of the way outward from the center. Most of the stars in our galaxy are thought to host their own families of planets. Thousands of these extrasolar planets (or exoplanets) have been discovered so far, with thousands more candidates detected and awaiting confirmation. Many of these newly discovered planetary systems are quite different from our own.
In fact, part of the fun of astronomy in the eyes of many is going and seeing if you can indeed find a new planet, or star that hadn’t been noticed before, and seeing what details you notice about it. In fact, various agencies from NASA to the ESA and more have made their own satellites and probes and such that they’ve launched into space or our atmosphere to try and get better looks at planets and stars and see what we can find.
Some of the highlights for sure are many planets that are “Earth-Like” in structure or form or shape. Numerous kinds of stars from dwarf stars to binary stars, to Pulsars, Supernovas and more. They’ve found black holes at the center of most galaxies, and that’s still only scratching the surface of things.
4. Exoplanets
#InsaneCuriosity #TheSolarSystem #TheEdgeOfTheUniverse

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