Tag Archives: brightside youtube

your mind will collapse if you try to imagine this | UNIVERSE SIZE COMPARISON



special video to my 3000 subs, welcome to this travel for the universe and thanks for watch this video

next awesome video “COMPARISON OF THE DISTANCES IN THE UNIVERSE”:

DATA:

1 LIGHT YEAR = 9 460 730 472 580.8 km

NEBULA: A nebula is a giant cloud of dust and gas in space. Some nebulae (more than one nebula) come from the gas and dust thrown out by the explosion of a dying star, such as a supernova. Other nebulae are regions where new stars are beginning to form

GALAXY: A galaxy is a huge collection of gas, dust, and billions of stars and their solar systems, all held together by gravity.

UNIVERSE: he Universe is all of space and time and their contents, including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy.

PLUTO: Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930 as the ninth planet from the Sun. After 1992, its status as a planet was questioned following the discovery of several objects of similar size in the Kuiper belt. In 2005, Eris, a dwarf planet in the scattered disc which is 27% more massive than Pluto, was discovered. This led the International Astronomical Union (IAU) to define the term “planet” formally in 2006, during their 26th General Assembly. That definition excluded Pluto and reclassified it as a dwarf planet.

MOON:The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits Earth as its only natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). The Moon is, after Jupiter’s satellite Io, the second-densest satellite in the Solar System among those whose densities are known.

MERCURY: Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet in the Solar System. Its orbit around the Sun takes only 87.97 days, the shortest of all the planets in the Solar System. It is named after the Roman deity Mercury, the messenger of the gods.

MARS: Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury. In English, Mars carries a name of the Roman god of war and is often referred to as the ‘Red Planet’. The latter refers to the effect of the iron oxide prevalent on Mars’ surface, which gives it a reddish appearance distinctive among the astronomical bodies visible to the naked eye. Mars is a terrestrial planet with a thin atmosphere, having surface features reminiscent both of the impact craters of the Moon and the valleys, deserts, and polar ice caps of Earth.

VENUS: Venus is the second planet from the Sun. It is named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty. As the second-brightest natural object in the night sky after the Moon, Venus can cast shadows and, rarely, is visible to the naked eye in broad daylight. Venus lies within Earth’s orbit, and so never appears to venture far from the Sun, setting in the west just after dusk and rising in the east a bit before dawn. Venus orbits the Sun every 224.7 Earth days. With a rotation period of 243 Earth days, it takes longer to rotate about its axis than any planet in the Solar System and rotates in the opposite direction to all but Uranus (meaning the Sun rises in the west and sets in the east). Venus does not have any natural satellites, a distinction it shares only with Mercury among planets in the Solar System.

EARTH:
Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

KEPPLER 22 B: also known by its Kepler object of interest designation KOI-087.01, is an extrasolar planet orbiting within the habitable zone of the Sun-like star Kepler-22. It is located about 587 light-years (180 pc) from Earth in the constellation of Cygnus. It was discovered by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope in December 2011 and was the first known transiting planet to orbit within the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. Kepler-22 is too dim to be seen with the naked eye.

NEPTUNE: Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System. In the Solar System, it is the fourth-largest planet by diameter, the third-most-massive planet, and the densest giant planet. Neptune is 17 times the mass of Earth, slightly more massive than its near-twin Uranus. Neptune is denser and physically smaller than Uranus because its greater mass causes more gravitational compression of its atmosphere. Neptune orbits the Sun once every 164.8 years at an average distance of 30.1 au (4.5 billion km; 2.8 billion mi). It is named after the Roman god of the sea and has the astronomical symbol ♆, a stylised version of the god Neptune’s trident.

I DO NOT HAVE SPACE FOR MORE DATA 🙁

¡Happy new year 2020!

source

The Secret Side of Sir Isaac Newton



Exploring the secret side to the famous scientist.
*If you enjoyed this bio, here are some others on my channel*
How Marie Curie’s Genius Killed Her
Why Nikola Tesla is Less Famous than Thomas Edison
The Secret Life of Albert Einstein
Why Leonardo da Vinci was a Scientist

Have a story idea? ►

Merch ►

Created by Cindy Pom
Twitter ►
Instagram ►

Connect with Newsthink
Twitter ►
TikTok ►

Featured music from Storyblocks ►
0:01 – 2:00 Gymnopedie by Keith Anthony Holden
2:01 – 4:28 Broken by Michael Vignola
4:29 – 6:22 Piano Arpeggios by Christina Nemo
6:26 – 9:04 Moody and fast moving minimalist piano for serious drama by Gerardo Garcia Jr.

Thank you to my Patrons, including:
Jakob Davis (Patreon Executive Producer), Ronil Patel, Chesky Neceski, Austin Grant, Darren Tyrell-Knights, Tom Eng, Tim Desir, Ryan Bresser, Justin Anderson, Neo Ge
Support Newsthink on Patreon ►

Correction:
@6:59 I referred to mercury as a compound. Mercury is an element, not a compound. Clearly should have paid more attention in chemistry class!

Thanks to the following for permission of use:
Westminster Abbey
The King’s School
Woolsthorpe Manor footage:
Newton papers: Cambridge University Library (CC BY-NC 3.0)
Newton papers: The National Library of Israel

Other sources:
0:38 David Alred @daldred007
0:56 Tamela Maciel @TamelaMaciel
1:05 Martinevans123, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons
1:19 Fritzbruno, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
2:10 Rita Greer, FAL, via Wikimedia Commons
3:48 Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images. CC BY 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons
3:56 Andrew Gray — original photos, Alexey Gomankov — collage, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
4:20 elhombredenegro, CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
4:29 Paul Hermans, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
4:39 Andrew Dunn CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia
5:53 Dirk Ingo Franke, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
6:50 Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images CC BY 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons
7:22 The Portable Antiquities Scheme/ The Trustees of the British Museum, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons
7:28 The Portable Antiquities Scheme/ The Trustees of the British Museum, CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
7:33 Gregory Edmund, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons
7:50 Rita Greer, FAL, via Wikimedia Commons
7:59 Tom Morris, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
8:08 Look and Learn lookandlearn.com (Newsthink is a registered license holder)

source

The Elephant's Foot – Corpse of Chernobyl



Join [THE FACILITY] right now for members-only live streams, behind-the-scenes posts, and office hours with me:

Twitter:
Instagram:

Artist: Masood Safdarian
Editor: Lilit Aramyan
ARIA: @ClaireMax
Smart boi: Kyle
Music: bensound.com
Sound effects: freesound.org

source

MBARI's Top 10 deep-sea animals

MBARI’s Top 10 deep-sea animals

The deep sea—Earth’s largest habitat—is home to a host of magical and mysterious animals. As we help our education and conservation partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium prepare for the exhibit Into the Deep: Exploring Our Undiscovered Ocean, launching in 2022, they were curious to know which denizens of the deep are our favorites? With that question in mind, we gathered five of MBARI’s finest deep-sea biologists—Shannon Johnson, Kakani Katija, George Matsumoto, Bruce Robison, and Susan von Thun—and came up with a list of ten favorites. You might be surprised to see what made our list and what makes these creatures so lovable.

For more than three decades, MBARI researchers have been exploring the deep ocean with remotely operated vehicles, discovering fascinating ways that life in the deep sea has evolved to thrive in this dark, cold world. Our ocean is vast and full of things yet unseen. Every time we set out on an expedition, we are amazed by new observations and we are excited to share ten of those discoveries with you!

Learn more about MBARI research and the incredible discoveries we’ve made as we explore the ocean at

Monterey Bay Aquarium video production team: Christy Chamberlain, Presley Adamson
Editor: Lou Laprocido
MBARI video production team: Kyra Schlining, Susan von Thun, Nancy Jacobsen Stout, Heidi Cullen

Follow MBARI on social media:
Facebook:
Twitter:
Instagram:
Tumblr:
LinkdIn:

Follow the Monterey Bay Aquarium on social media:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Instagram:
Tumblr:
Twitch:
TikTok now too:

source

How to use the Bathroom in Space

How to use the Bathroom in Space

One of the most frequent questions we get about life on Space Station is how to use the toilet…Here’s a quick look at the answer!
-Expedition 63 Commander Chris Cassidy

__________________________
FOLLOW ASTRONAUT CHRIS CASSIDY
Instagram:
Twitter:

FOLLOW NASA ASTRONAUTS
Facebook:
Twitter:
Instagram:

Video produced at the NASA Johnson Space Center
Producer/Editor: Jamie Quinn

source

What Happens If You Only Eat Raw Meat?

What Happens If You Only Eat Raw Meat?

Head to to save 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain using code WHATIF.

Have you ever heard of the raw meat diet? That’s right, a diet that consists of eating raw meat all day, every day. Most of us have been taught to avoid raw meat like it’s the plague, but is it really that bad for you? These people seem to be doing all right, I guess. What would be the best way to eat raw meat? How would it affect your body? And what are the benefits of this diet?

Transcript and sources:

Subscribe to our second channel called “How to Survive”:

Can you translate this episode into another language? Add subtitles and we will link your YouTube channel in the description:

Watch more what-if scenarios:
Planet Earth:
The Cosmos:
Technology:
Your Body:
Humanity:

T-shirts and merch:
Suggest an episode:
Newsletter:
Feedback and inquiries:

What If elsewhere:
Instagram:
Twitter:
Facebook:
What If in Spanish:
What If in Mandarin:
Podcast:

What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure through time, space and chance while we (hopefully) boil down complex subjects in a fun and entertaining way.

Produced with love by Underknown in Toronto:

source

What If Betelgeuse Exploded Right Now?

What If Betelgeuse Exploded Right Now?

At about 950 times bigger than our Sun, Betelgeuse is one of the biggest stars in our Universe. But that comes with a price. Just like us, stars have a life expectancy, and Betelgeuse is no different. It’s a ticking time bomb that’s ready to go, but we’re not sure when. So, what if today was the day Betelgeuse went out with a bang? How would the Earth be affected? And will our Universe ever be the same?

Transcript and sources:

Sign up for our What If Explorers Club weekly newsletter for exclusives & giveaways:

Join our Patreon community and help make What If better:

Can you translate this episode into another language? Add subtitles and we will link your YouTube channel in the description:

Watch more what-if scenarios:
Planet Earth:
The Cosmos:
Technology:
Your Body:
Humanity:

T-shirts and merch:
Suggest an episode (detailed):
Newsletter:
Feedback and inquiries:

What If elsewhere:
Instagram:
Twitter:
Facebook:
What If in Spanish:
What If in Mandarin:

What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure through time, space and chance while we (hopefully) boil down complex subjects in a fun and entertaining way.

Produced with love by Underknown in Toronto:
#Betelgeuse

source

What If Two Black Holes Collided?

What If Two Black Holes Collided?

Black holes are the gravitational monsters of the Universe. They are so powerful that nothing, even light, can escape their grasp. One black hole is bad enough. But if you took two black holes and smashed them into each other, they’d be capable of changing the shape of space itself. How epic would that explosion be? And could it somehow reach the Earth?

Transcript and sources:

Join our Patreon community and help make What If better:

Can you translate this episode into another language? Translate this video and we will link your YouTube channel in the description:

Watch more what-if scenarios:
Planet Earth:
The Cosmos:
Technology:
Your Body:
Humanity:

Tweet us your what-if question to suggest an episode:

What If elsewhere:
Instagram:
Twitter:
Facebook:

Our thumbnail was created by Alex. Check out more of his art on his Instagram:

What If comes in other languages!
What If in Spanish:
What If in Mandarin:

Suggest an episode (detailed):
T-shirts and merch:

Feedback and inquiries:

What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure — grounded in scientific theory — through time, space and chance, as we ask what if some of the most fundamental aspects of our existence were different.

source