Tag Archives: moon

Can SpaceX Starship & Blue Origin Really Go To The Moon?

Can SpaceX Starship & Blue Origin Really Go To The Moon?

From the goals, to the plans, to the rivals, and more, join me as we ask the question of whether SpaceX can send their starship to the moon!

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13 Mysterious Moon Facts!

When you look at space, there are a lot of things out there that we as humans want to reach. And the first thing that we truly reached and could grasp was the moon itself. On July 20th 1969, after many years of trials, tribulations, setbacks, delays, fears and more, we sent three men into space, and two of them landed on the moon (the third stayed in the craft just for the record, someone had to watch their ride!). It was a triumphant moment in human history. But it was also something that afterwards…lost its luster in terms of repeating the feat.
We did go back to the moon multiple times, but each time it got more and more costly, more and more questioned, until eventually the Apollo program (which was the program to get people to the moon) was outright canceled. Only recently did things start to look better for the program as both NASA and Elon Musk via SpaceX decided to go and inspire the human race to try and get back to the moon in a good amount of time. In fact, it could be that we get to the moon again very soon, even before we reach the long-awaited Mars. Or at least, that’s what Elon Musk thinks:
“Well, this is gonna sound pretty crazy, but I think we could land on the moon in less than two years,” Musk told Time. “Certainly with an uncrewed vehicle I believe we could land on the moon in two years. So then maybe within a year or two of that we could be sending crew. I would say four years at the outside.”
In other words, Musk is saying his conservative estimate for sending people back to the moon aboard a SpaceX vehicle is 2023, the year before NASA hopes to send a crew — including the first female astronaut to visit the moon — as part of its new Artemis program.
You might think that this is a friendly competition thing going on, but it’s a little more complicated than that. You see, Elon Musk started SpaceX with others to try and restore humanities faith in reaching out to the stars, and it’s worked. But more importantly than that, he wanted to make an independent space company that didn’t rely on government funding (like NASA) and thus be able to make spaceships, satellites, and more at a much cheaper cost. Which, again, he succeeded in. This has actually put NASA and SpaceX on great terms, and the two are working together in various ways. Including sending certain SpaceX ships up to the International Space Station, and working together on plans to help get humanity to Mars.
However, NASA has noted recently that they desire to go the moon on their own craft, which of course prompted a response from Elon:
“If it were to take longer to convince NASA and the authorities that we can do it versus just doing it, then we might just do it. It may literally be easier to just land Starship on the moon than try to convince NASA that we can.”
And that right there is one of the cruxes of Elon Musk’s belief in his team and his spaceships. If he thinks he can do something, he’ll push to do it, and he’s been more right than wrong in recent months and years with his programs. His communications satellite system Starlink has started launching and is getting closer to its first minor test in North America. The various starships that he’s making is getting more and more tests, and so on and so forth.
That being said, we all know that Elon Musk can talk more than he can produce at times. A lot of his spaceships in recent months have had issues, including one of his ships trying to launch and creating a massive fireball instead. The ship was fine and it was revealed that a leak in a system caused a fireball, but still, it delayed future plans by a significant margin.
Which is why many aren’t exactly believing that Elon Musk is going to reach the moon in the next few years because of the uncertainty of space travel and all the dangers that can go along with it.
But, that doesn’t mean that NO ONE may be able to reach the moon in the next few years…
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Jeff Bezos is the founder of Amazon, you know the major website where you likely have bought more things than you care to admit? And throughout his life, he’s had a fascination with space. So much so that it was him who found the Apollo 11 Engines that were jettisoned during the launch of the legendary mission.
But unlike many, he’s not looking to Mars (unlike NASA and SpaceX among others), he feels that humanity has a lot to get from the moon itself.

#InsaneCuriosity #ToTheMoon #MarsColonization

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World's Future Events By 2100!

World’s Future Events By 2100!

World’s Future Events By 2100!
From what the future will bring, to the events that could change our world forever, join us as we explore what events will happen by 2100!

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What Will Happen By 2090!

I know it’s hard to look at the future and say exactly what’ll happen. If you think about it, we’re in 2020, but if you asked people in 1920 what today would look like? Yeah, their answers would be VASTLY different. Don’t forget that this point in time was supposed to be the “sci-fi” future that a lot of people envisioned (we’re already past Back To The Future for example). So in truth, there is no real way of knowing what’s going to happen between now and 2100. However, there are things that we can predict, try to acknowledge as likely, and see what humanity might just accomplish.
So let’s start off with the very near future. Mainly, 2021. It’s in this year that the James Webb Telescope is expected to launch. So…what is it?
“The James Webb Space Telescope is the most ambitious and complex astronomical project ever built, and bringing it to life is a long, meticulous process.
So basically, the reason that we need this telescope/observatory is because without it, we will be unable to observe a large part of the universe that we can only speculate on right now with the other devices we have. P
. And so in the VERY near future, we could have a greater understanding of our universe. Which is perfect, because also in 2021 we’re allegedly going to get the first “space hotel”.
No, really.
“We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel,” said Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora Station to the world.

Another thing you can bet on is our desire to go back to the moon, which allegedly is going to happen in 2023. Which would mean that if successful, it would’ve been about 50 years between the current (2023) and last (1976) manned moon mission. Don’t get me wrong, we’ve launched MANY thing to the moon between that time period, but a manned mission to land on the moon? Not so much.

And now…for the event that I’m sure you want to talk about…getting to Mars. SpaceX is leading the charge on this one, as they’re endeavoring to send humans to Mars in the year 2024. Or more accurately, the mission to Mars will START in 2024, and they’ll likely land therein 2025.
The goal of this “first phase” of the mission is simple, he wants to get the people to Mars (call that Step 1) and then see how they’re able to interact on the planet, how well the cargo supplies hold up, and of course, set up the first “home” on the planet.

Elon Musk intends to have a livable base, generators that will run off of various power sources on Mars to ensure they don’t run out of power, and more.
. So obviously SpaceX, NASA and many others are working together to try and suss out all the kinks and possibilities to give this launch and mission one of the smoothest things around.
What we’re also hoping to be smooth is an event going on in 2029, less than a decade from now we’re going to have a close encounter of the asteroid kind. Specifically a rock called 99942 Apophis that was detected all the way back in 2004 and predicted to potentially hit the Earth in 2029. This has since been toned down to saying that it’ll pass by Earth just 20,000 miles above the surface. Which is still REALLY close, but barring something happening, we don’t have to worry about us getting hit.

Halley’s Comet is known as a “short period comet”, as it circles the confines of space, and then arrives back at Earth every 75-76 years. So if you’re lucky, you could see it twice in a lifetime.
Now, in 2069, another very important NASA mission is said to happen, but you can take this one with a grain of salt because of advances in technology happening right now. You see, NASA wants to send a craft to the place known as Alpha Centauri. Alpha Centauri is a place that you may have heard about because it’s a place where it’s said that a very Earth-like planet resides. The problem is that it’s over 4 light years away and in our quickest ship it would take tens of thousands of years to reach there…not fun.
I mentioned, there is a project being made right now that could send things to Alpha Centauri a LOT fast, and it’s set to launch in the next decade or so. Thus, if it works…we could have a look at the system a lot sooner. Time will tell.
From a look to the stars, to the remains of our world, 2095 (based on current calculations) will be a devastating year for Earth because of the fact that we’ll have cut down the entire Amazon Rainforest.
As for 2100, if we reach that point, our population will be over 11 billion (overpopulation)

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What Would Happen If The Moon Disappeared?

What Would Happen If The Moon Disappeared?

What would happen if the moon disappeared?
Our moon had a great status from the beginning of human civilization, it was immortalized by
various religions all around the world. In greek mythology there was a moon goddess named
Selene the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia, it was worshiped and respected the
same way as the sun god Helios which indicates that our ancestors placed the moon and the
sun on equal footing. Moon is also worshiped in Hindu mythology by those who have
fluctuations in their life, ups and downs and by those who wish to have sons.
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The moon is featured in Van Gogh’s masterpiece “The starry night” , Frank Sinatra’s delightful song “Fly me
to the moon” and many other captivating art works. Art and history have always been enchanted
by the moon but today we intend to highlight the important role of the moon in elevating our
civilization from a scientific perspective. Our aim is to answer the question “ what would happen
if the moon disappeared? “

Before answering that question here are some facts about the moon:
1- The moon is the nearest and brightest celestial object orbiting the Earth in an elliptical path. It
may not follow the same path every cycle due to the fact that its orbit orientation is not entirely
fixed in space but rotates over time resulting in precession and inclination. Its apparent size
differs from the actual size due to the relative motion to an observer on the earth, you can
understand this as follows, the nearer an object to you the bigger you will see it.
2- The moon was formed 4.51 billion years ago approximately after 60 million years of the entire
formation of the solar system. There are several models regarding the moon formation but the
prevailing model is that the Earth-Moon system was formed due to an extremely huge impact
between a Mars sized celestial body called Theia and the proto-Earth, which is the earth at its
very early stages. The impact resulted in the Earth with its shape today and some other material
in its orbit which accreted and formed the moon.
3- Like the earth, the moon is a differentiated celestial body that can be divided into crust,
mantle and core. The Core is solid with a molten iron boundary around it, the mantle is the
largest layer formed by a complex yet extremely important process called the magma fractional
crystallization. The geo-chemical mapping of the moon rocks collected by the Apollo mission
suggests that the crust is mainly composed of mafic minerals which are rich in magnesium and
iron.
4- The photodecomposition process prevents the formation of water on the lunar surface. In
other words, the photons radiated by the sun decompose the water molecules formed on the
lunar surface.

After knowing some interesting facts about the moon and how it was formed, It’s time to
consider the main question of today’s episode.
1- You may wonder what is exactly the relation between the moonlight absence and the
disturbance of the ecosystem because at the first glance they may seem completely unrelated,
however they are strongly connected. The ecosystem is by definition a biological community of
interacting organisms and their physical environment, it contains biotic and abiotic parts; the
biotic parts include all the living organisms whereas the abiotic components include the
environmental factors such as rocks, temperature and humidity. According to the encyclopedia
of national geographic, every factor in the ecosystem depends on every other factor either
directly or indirectly and the slight disturbance in one factor will end up affecting the whole
ecosystem; for example the change in temperature of an ecosystem will limit the type of plants
that grow in there and hence will affect the animals that depend on these plants as a primary
source of food and shelter leading them to adapt to that change or move to another ecosystem
or perish. Another important and related concept to highlight is the food chain; which describes
how energy and nutrients move through an ecosystem. In the food chain, energy is transferred
from one living organism through another in the form of food. There are primary producers such
as plants, primary consumers such as animals that depend on plants as their food source and
secondary consumers such as predators and decomposing organisms.

#InsaneCuriosity #ToTheMoon #MoonFactsAndHistory

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Can We Colonize The Moon By 2024?

Can We Colonize The Moon By 2024?

From whether we can get to it regularly, to why it would need to be done a certain way, join me as we explore whether we can colonize the moon by 2024( or 2030)To the moon!

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Let’s be honest with ourselves for a minute, shall we? As we begin this brand new decade of life on Earth, there are certain “goals” that every nation is trying to achieve. And for a more “global” goal, the mission is to get to Mars…and then start to colonize it. Trust me when I say that there are a LOT of plans on how to get to Mars in a decent amount of time and to start colonizing it as soon as possible. To the extent that if the plans work, and if everything goes as it should, we could be living on Mars in a certain capacity by the end of the decade.
But for some scientists, they see this as…inefficient to a certain extent. Not the least of which is because Mars is hundreds of millions of miles away from Earth at its closest point (due to the orbits of Earth and Mars not being on the same timeframe), and yet there is something much, MUCH closer to Earth for us to colonize…the moon.
Now sure, Mars has been the focus in recent years because of discoveries of water on Mars, and certain other things that could make it a livable place, but what about the moon? Have we honestly ever thought about colonizing it? Yeah, much more than you might think. In fact there are plans to potentially have it done by 2024, and one time there was even a plan to have it settled by 2022.
So what exactly has stopped us from doing this wonderful thing? Simple, money. Isn’t that always the answer? NASA used to be a very well funded operation, but now, their budget is much more slashed than in previous decades. While we are still aiming to get to Mars, it’s much more of a long term project for NASA, while companies like SpaceX are doing more private and low-cost funding in order to help them get to their goals for the red planet.
Thus, by that token, one cannot have one and the other. Do we colonize Mars, or the moon? Most people have chosen Mars for various reasons, but not all, especially since some people believe they can do it AND Mars within the budget NASA:
“The US could lead a return of humans to the surface of the Moon within a period of 5-7 years from authority to proceed at an estimated total cost of about $10 billion (±30 percent),” conclude NASA’s Alexandra Hall and NextGen Space’s Charles Miller in one of the papers about colonizing the moon.
A bold claim, and one that got many people’s attention. Especially when he explained how a formerly $150 billion dollar spacecraft would now cost $10 billion total for the whole thing. The answer there is that technology has grown a lot since the 70’s:
“The big takeaway,” McKay told Popular Science, “is that new technologies, some of which have nothing to do with space – like self-driving cars and waste-recycling toilets – are going to be incredibly useful in space, and are driving down the cost of a moon base to the point where it might be easy to do.”
In short, since we already have the materials here on Earth to build spacecraft, and people at SpaceX are doing it much cheaper than NASA, there’s no reason to think we can’t go to the moon and set up colonies there all the while doing our thing here on Earth and getting ready for Mars.
Some even think that the need to go to the moon ( lunar surface) is a perfect “prequel” to going to Mars:
“My interest is not the Moon. To me the Moon is as dull as a ball of concrete,” NASA astrobiologist Chris McKay, who edited the special, open-access issue of New Space journal,( use news) told Sarah Fecht over at Popular Science. “But we’re not going to have a research base on Mars until we can learn how to do it on the Moon first. The Moon provides a blueprint to Mars.”
Everything in regards to the moon colony mission is being furthered every day, especially when it comes to things like Blue Origin offering to help get people there.
What is Blue Origin? Well, that would be Jeff Bezos’ (founder of Amazon) personal space company (not unlike what Elon Musk has with SpaceX), and what he is working on is a reusable engine that wouldn’t just send astronauts to the moon, but also send tourists into space. All of which would help make Bezos billions of dollars in contracts from various space agencies since his rockets are currently very advanced. Plus, having reusable rockets saves time from having to build individual ones for each mission. Which obviously can be very costly as well.
Has he actually proven that his rockets work? Yes, actually he has, he has two rockets that he has both in the works and is also testing. One of them is the 59-foot New Shepherd Model. This is the one that he aims to use to put people into space. In May of 2019 he launched and landed one of these powerful rockets without any issue.

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Callisto: Jupiter's Cratered Moon!

Callisto: Jupiter’s Cratered Moon!

From its discovery, to its importance around Jupiter, and more! Join us as we explore Callisto, Jupiter’s Moon.
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9. Discovery and Naming Of Callisto
Callisto was discovered Jan. 7, 1610, by Italian scientist Galileo Galilei along with Jupiter’s three other largest moons: Ganymede, Europa and Io.
Artemis. Who was also the goddess of the moon for the record. The name was suggested by Simon Marius soon after Callisto’s discovery. Marius attributed the suggestion to Johannes Kepler.
However, the names of the Galilean satellites fell into disfavor for a considerable time, and were not revived in common use until the mid-20th century. In much of the earlier astronomical literature, Callisto is referred to by its Roman numeral designation, a system introduced by Galileo, as Jupiter IV or as “the fourth satellite of Jupiter”.
Now though it’s known as Callisto by most texts, including ones you’ll see in school in hear about when moons like these are discovered. The desire to keep things simple while also rooting much naming in mythology has been desired by astronomers in earlier decades.
8. Orbit and Rotation
Callisto is the outermost of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter. It orbits at a distance of approximately 1,170,000 miles (26.3 times the radius of Jupiter itself). This is significantly larger than the orbital radius of the next-closest Galilean satellite, Ganymede. As a result of this relatively distant orbit, Callisto does not participate in the mean-motion resonance—in which the three inner Galilean satellites are locked—and probably never has.
Like most other regular planetary moons, Callisto’s rotation is locked to be synchronous with its orbit. The length of Callisto’s day, simultaneously its orbital period, is about 16.7 Earth days. Its orbit is very slightly eccentric and inclined to the Jovian equator, with the eccentricity and inclination changing quasi-periodically due to solar and planetary gravitational perturbations on a timescale of centuries. These orbital variations cause the axial tilt (the angle between rotational and orbital axes) to vary between 0.4 and 1.6°.
The dynamical isolation of Callisto means that it has never been appreciably tidally heated, which has important consequences for its internal structure and evolution. Its distance from Jupiter also means that the charged-particle flux from Jupiter’s magnetosphere at its surface is relatively low—about 300 times lower than, for example, that at Europa. Hence, unlike the other Galilean moons, charged-particle irradiation has had a relatively minor effect on Callisto’s surface. The radiation level at Callisto’s surface is equivalent to a dose of aCallisto is named after one of Zeus’s many lovers in Greek mythology. Callisto was a nymph (or, according to some sources, the daughter of Lycaon) who was associated with the goddess of the hunt, bout 0.01 rem per day, which is over ten times higher than Earth’s average background radiation.
6. Surface Of The Moon
Callisto’s rocky, icy surface is the oldest and most heavily cratered in our solar system. The surface is about 4 billion years old and it’s been pummeled, likely by comets and asteroids. Because the impact craters are still visible, scientists think the moon has little geologic activity—there are no active volcanoes or tectonic shifting to erode the craters. Callisto looks like it’s sprinkled with bright white dots that scientists think are the peaks of the craters capped with water ice.
The moons of Jupiter have been something of a fascination for many astronomers and scientists. So when the Earth had the ability to look at the moons via satellites and probes they almost literally jumped at the chance. To the extent that Callisto has been visited many times of the last several decades.
The Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 Jupiter encounters in the early 1970s contributed little new information about Callisto in comparison with what was already known from Earth-based observations ironically enough.
The real breakthrough happened later with the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979. They imaged more than half of the Callistoan surface with a resolution of 1–2 km, and precisely measured its temperature, mass and shape. A second round of exploration lasted from 1994 to 2003, when the Galileo spacecraft had eight close encounters with Callisto, the last flyby during the C30 orbit in 2001 came as close as 138 km to the surface.

#InsaneCuriosity

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The Sun Facts And History!

The Sun Facts And History!

From the kind of star it is, to its impact on our world, and more! Join me as we explore the Sun: Facts and History.
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8. Our Star
Without a doubt, if you were to list the “most important things in the solar system we live in”, the Earth may be No.1, but the sun is No.2. And for all the reasons that you might expect and know.
Its gravity holds the solar system together, keeping everything from the biggest planets to the smallest particles of debris in its orbit. Electric currents in the Sun generate a magnetic field that is carried out through the solar system by the solar wind—a stream of electrically charged gas blowing outward from the Sun in all directions.
The connection and interactions between the Sun and Earth drive the seasons, ocean currents, weather, climate, radiation belts and aurora.
In short, and in long, the sun is vital to just about everything we do on this planet, and we rely on the sun to do MANY things, even though we’re honestly not controlling anything that it does. Which is a bit of an odd thing for humanity as humans like to control EVERYTHING that has to do with us.
The sun is something we see almost every day (obviously unless cloud cover is blocking it or an eclipse is happening) and even when we don’t see it, we feel its presence. It’s more than just a ball of light in the sky, it’s an energy source, a lifeline in many respects, and as noted above, it helps shape our planet in various ways that would detrimental if it WASN’T doing it.
So if someone was to honestly ask you just how important the sun is, you should tell them all the ways we need the sun, our star, to shine on.
7. Distance From Earth and Its Size
With a radius of 432,168.6 miles (695,508 kilometers), our Sun is not an especially large star—many are several times bigger—but it is still far more massive than our home planet: 332,946 Earths match the mass of the Sun. The Sun’s volume would need 1.3 million Earths to fill it.
Which at first might seem like a bad thing. After all, would we WANT to have a giant ball of fire and radiation just lurking out there that can swallow us whole if it felt like it? Honestly, yes, yes we would, and for a very simple reason, its distance from the Earth.
The Sun is 93 million miles (150 million kilometers) from Earth. Which is a very LONG ways away, and in fact it’s such a distance that they came up with a term for it via “Astronomical Unit”. So when you hear that a planet or star is say 103 AUs away, that means it’s 103 times the distance between the Earth and the sun.
Going back to the distance itself, you might think that this is a “very long way away” from the entity that gives us light and essentially, life. But actually, it’s better that we’re NOT closer to the sun for a whole host of reasons.
Sunlight and its energy dissipates the farther you get away from it. Which is why there is such thing as a “Habitable Zone” in regards to stars where life can exist as well as water and other key things needed for life.
The closer you are to a star, the more impact you’re going to get from its heat and light. The farther you are from a star, the less likely you’re going to get heat and light in the amounts you need. Lest you think we’re exaggerating this, we have the perfect examples for this. It’s called Mercury, Venus and Mars.
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun, and it’s scorching hot as a result. It’s average temperature is 800 degrees Fahrenheit. Plus, because it’s so close to the sun it’s tidally locked, meaning that it has one “side” always facing the sun, and the other side is always away from it.
In regards to Venus, it’s our “twin” but also a case of the suns energy turning it into something else entirely. A buildup of heat and excess carbon dioxide turned it into a “Runaway Greenhouse Planet” which makes it so hot that it can melt lead. And it’s also the hottest planet in the solar system because of the greenhouse effect which was caused by the suns’ radiation.
Heading to Mars, it’s so far away from the Sun that it can’t absorb the sunlight and energy like we do on Earth, so its average temperature is -81 degrees Fahrenheit. Not to mention it doesn’t have a typical atmosphere in any sense so various solar and cosmic rays bombard the planet. And it’s so far away from the sun that even if Earth settled on the planet, using solar panels to get energy for colonies wouldn’t be as viable as you think because the distance is so great.
So as you can see, it’s GOOD that we are 93 million miles away from the sun, it’s the literal perfect spot to be in to get the positive effects of the sun without many of the negatives.

#InsaneCuriosity #TheSun #TheSolarSystem

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What If Every Satellite Fell to Earth?

What If Every Satellite Fell to Earth?

Thousands of satellites and pieces of debris currently orbit our Earth. They provide us with television, internet, and communications. But what if all these satellites suddenly went offline? And then came crashing down to Earth? What would a crashing satellite do to the Earth? How many satellites would come falling down?

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What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure through time, space and chance while we (hopefully) boil down complex subjects in a fun and entertaining way.

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